Pipeline Protest Pumpkins Send a Halloween Message to Louisiana's Governor

All Photos Courtesy L’eau Est La Vie Camp
All Photos Courtesy L’eau Est La Vie Camp

It’s Halloween, but some environmentalists can’t take a break. In Louisiana, opponents to the proposed 163-mile long Bayou Bridge Pipeline headed to the Capitol today. And they brought pumpkins.

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Roughly 20 people went to demand Gov. John Bel Edwards require an environmental impact statement for the proposed crude oil pipeline, Cherri Foytlin, state director of Bold Louisiana, told Earther. With 10 pumpkins among them, organizers carried their various carvings to send a message.

The theme was simple: No Bayou Bridge Pipeline.

Activists set up their pumpkins outside Gov. John Bel Edwards’ home.
Activists set up their pumpkins outside Gov. John Bel Edwards’ home.
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They went to both the Capitol and Edwards’ home. The pipeline is owned, in part, by Energy Transfer Partners, the same company behind the Dakota Access Pipeline, which drew opposition from indigenous peoples around the world.

Similarly, some indigenous leaders in Louisiana are worried what the crude oil pipeline could do to their water supply in the face of an incident—and to their lands. It’s set to connect the crude oil supply from the Bakken Formation in North Dakota to St. James, Louisiana, where it would run through wetlands.

“Stop ETP,” the pumpkin reads, referring to Energy Transfer Partners.
“Stop ETP,” the pumpkin reads, referring to Energy Transfer Partners.

So far, the pipeline has received a permit from the state Department of Natural Resources, but opponents took that to court in May. The suit alleges that the state didn’t sufficiently analyze the project’s impacts on local communities. Until that’s resolved, the pipeline is awaiting permits from the Army Corps of Engineers and Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality.

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Environmental impact statements are a rarity in Louisiana for pipelines, but opponents to this protect are determined. These pumpkins—which read “Stop ETP,” short for Energy Transfer Partners and “Mni wiconi,” Lakota for “Water is life”—are just the latest reminder that the fight will go on.

The last pipeline says, “Mni wiconi,” or “Water is life,” in Lakota.
The last pipeline says, “Mni wiconi,” or “Water is life,” in Lakota.
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Yessenia Funes is climate editor at Atmos Magazine. She loves Earther forever.

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DISCUSSION

dnapl
Dense non aqueous phase liquid

Here’s how the Bayou Bridge Pipeline fits into the big picture of taking away Bakken light crude from North Dakota, just north of Standing Rock Sioux, to Illinois and from Illinois to eventually Louisiana

The purple line is DAPL and the yellow line is the existing Trunkline that is being converted from natural gas to crude. The Bayou Bridge line goes from the circle to the triangle on the map somewhere near Texas or whatever that state’s called.

Here’s where all that Bakken Crude goes when it goes to Illinois. The white dots on the left of the picture is the Patoka terminal. The red circle on the right is where DAPL officially ends. It ties into another line that brings crude oil down from Enbridge tank farms up near Chicago.

It’s mostly Illinois farmers living in and around Patoka, though. So maybe EJ doesn’t apply.